Kerry Stockdale (Deputy Headteacher & Art Teacher)

Will Woods (KS3 Teacher)

Objective: to develop drawing skills


Exercise 1: Continuous Line Drawing Exercise


Exercise 2: Backwards forwards drawing exercise

By Paula Briggs

Backwards forwards” sketching is a simple activity that helps develop two key skills:

  • It helps develop understanding and knowledge of subject matter through slow, careful observation.
  • It helps match speed of looking with speed of drawing, and therefore helps develop hand and eye coordination.

This post describes how to facilitate the backwards, forwards drawing exercise.


Exercise 3: See Three Shapes

By Paula Briggs

This resources shares a simple exercise to help children (or adults) appreciate how seeing simple shapes can help improve drawing skills, and how one material can be used in a variety of ways to create different qualities of line.

You will need:

 

  • Sheet of paper for each child.
  • Ink, or poster paint, in two thickness: the first being undiluted or thick, the second diluted down to a wash i.e. about 1 part paint and 5 parts water (approximately).
  • Painting/Drawing tools: A fine brush and a thick brush for each child.
  • An small, solid object to draw near each child, such as a pebble, apple, vegetable etc.

Summary of the exercise

  • Invite the children to stay quiet and concentrate.
  • Ask them to look slowly at the object in front of them before starting to draw.
    • Ask them to see the outline of the object.
    • Ask them to see the shadow the object makes on the ground
    • Ask them to see the shadow on the underside of the object.
  • When they have seen the above, they can start making their lines in the following order:
    • 1. Take the fine brush (or quill) and use undiluted paint or ink draw the outline of the object. Make sure it is a good size, i.e. not too small.
    • 2. Take a thicker brush and use the diluted paint or ink and make a single brush stroke to describe the shadow on the ground.
    • 3. Using the same thick brush and diluted paint or ink made a third mark to show the shadow on the object itself.
  • In a five minute exercise, atleast half the time might be spent looking before the children start to commit their drawing to paper

 

Exercise 4: Thoughtful Mark Making

By Paula Briggs

You will need:

  • A set of cards with different marks on: Simply fold and tear a sheet of paper until you have 8 or so “cards”. On each make a particular type of mark: a dash, a dot, single line cross hatching etc…
  • A sheet of paper for each child.
  • An object to draw near each child: a fossil, a key, a piece of fruit, or a feather…
  • A handwriting pen or a sharp B pencil for each child.

Summary of the exercise

 

  • This exercise will take between five and fifteen minutes*.
  • Invite the children to look carefully at the subject matter (which should be a single object placed near to each child).
  • Hold up a card and invite the children to begin to draw their object, using only the type of mark on that card.
  • Repeat with each card until the children have made a single drawing comprising lots of different types of marks.

Exercise 5: Making Stronger Drawings

By Paula Briggs

When working with children (or adults!) we try to do lots of mark making exercises to encourage them to use the whole range of values a pencil can make – from the palest to the darkest lines. We tried this drawing exercise at the beginning of a book art session, as a way to help the children understand how they could make really strong, powerful and confident drawings, rather than the tentative marks which some children naturally make. The children loved it!


 

Taken from AccessArt